Thursday Doors – Estero, Florida (& the Bathtub Messiah)

On December 29, 2014 at 7:13 am on a chilly midwestern morning, The Mrs & I pulled out of our driveway in our old mini-van, pulling our old pop-up Dutchmen Duck camper. We were headed south to the Fort Myers, Florida area for a few days of sunshine and inviting beaches. This was a rare opportunity for us, to leave town over New Years… In the past, one or the other of us would usually have a NY Eve commitment – I either had a band gig, or The Mrs was doing her one woman comedy show for First Night. But not this year!

We took a couple days to drive to Florida, and camped at the Koreshan State Historic Site in Estero, FL. We were 9 days in the warm sunshine of Florida! You can read about our escapades from the perspective of The Mrs starting HERE… I’m here to post a door picture. This is a picture of our little camper which we set up in the dark once we got to KSHS…

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And here, note the four doors on just one side of the historic Koreshan Planetary Court building. We were camped just a short walk from the grouping of old historic buildings that comprise the Koreshan compound.

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You can read more about the Koreshans and “The Bathtub Messiah”, starting with this interesting article.

And for some door pictures from the frozen Great White North, visit the website of the Door Sensei (先生) , Norm 2.0 … if you click on the blue frog towards the bottom of his posting, you will be magically transported to a page of portals to doors from AROUND THE WORLD!!!! WooHoo!!!

Hope’s Happy Birthday

I have been silent for over a week now, both on my blog and in my “real life”… I have been laid low with what I thought at first was just a cold, but it quickly transmogrified  into the flu. Blahhhhh… I did get my flu shot, so I am certain that is why I got the flu, right?  😉

That said, just a couple days ago, The Mrs posted Her Movie on YouTube! It is a real live indie feature length movie that she wrote, directed, starred in, edited, copyrighted, and released. It is titled,

HOPE’S HAPPY BIRTHDAY

You can also read more about the film at the IMDb (Internet Movie Database) HERE

The movie was filmed in Illinois (Springfield area) and Texas (Austin area).

I was going to do a summary , etc, but am still not feeling well, and just want to nap… maybe when i feel better…

Thursday Doors – The Cat’s Meow!

This is the reason why:

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Visit Norm 2.0 for more doors and details. When you get to Norm’s site, look for  The Blue Frog.

…the Blue Frog… I think that’s the name of a cheap wine I drank once in college. But I can’t remember…

First Door is of the storm door leading to our fenced back yard, highlighting, of course, the cat door I installed a few years ago to allow the cats to go outside without me having to get off my butt all the time…

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Kind of a Two Doors in One offering.

Second Door is the sliding door from the hot tub room to the same fenced back yard. Two things I would like to point out. #1 – The cat is Lester, who we have aptly named, The Escape Artist! (click this link to see Grace’s video explaining WHY!) and, B) the hot tub died so now this room serves as our winter greenhouse for all the plants we have in pots on the deck in the summer. Lots of FLOWERS!!

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This Third Door picture is a Find-the-Threeper Doors picture!

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This final picture is just~cuz…. Just Cuz today is so wonderfully sunny and the colors of the living leaves and flowers happily enlighten my day this day, I just had to share!!

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Thursday Door – Day Late, 1 Door

I was just too busy yesterday to post my Thursday Doors offering. Doing…. ummmmm… nothing???!  Ah well, so for my door this week, I have a door from a small little lane on the lake south of our lane. I drove down this lane last week while I was driving around in our area looking for a lost dog. Didn’t find the dog, but did see this neat door. I really like the echoing of the arches in the windows, doors, and roof lines…

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Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Visit Norm 2.0 for more doors and details. When you get to Norm’s site, look for and click on….

The Blue Frog, and only the Blue Frog….

 

How 1922 Doubled My Life

I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus at the age of 30. With Type 1 diabetes, the body has an auto-immune response, usually following an illness (I had the flu), and starts making anti-bodies that attack and destroy the Islet of Langerhans cells in the pancreas. The islet cells produce the body’s insulin. Insulin is required for nutrients to pass from the blood into the body cells. With the destruction of the islet cells, insulin has to be introduced into the body artificially. Diabetes has been recognized by the medical community for over 3000 years. A diagnosis of diabetes (type 1) was a death sentence within a year, at the longest. Until the 20th century.

On January 23, 1922, doctors and researchers at the University of Toronto (Canada) starting experimentally treating a recently diagnosed insulin patient (14 year-old Leonard Thompson) by injecting him with a refined sample of animal insulin. Leonard’s symptoms improved, and he went on to live another 13 more years by taking daily insulin injections. “The University of Toronto immediately gave pharmaceutical companies license to produce insulin, free of royalties. By 1923, insulin had become widely available, saving countless lives around the world, and (Dr. Frederick) Banting and (Dr. J.J.R.) Macleod were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine.”   from History.com

By the time I was diagnosed 66 years later, the technology of injectable insulin has advanced considerably. Insulin by then was no longer extracted animal insulin, but was manufactured in a lab (recombinant human insulin). Pure, inexpensive, and GMO at its lifesaving best. I began taking multiple injections of insulin daily.

I have a cousin who is a diabetes research doctor, and he spent many years studying ways to implant new islet cells in the body where the anti-bodies would not locate and destroy them.  This line of research has had limited success. I participated in a research study a few years ago into inhaled insulin. But to date, the biggest advance in insulin therapy has been the insulin pump. The pump provides a constant flow of insulin via a subcutaneous catheter, and can provide a manual bolus, or boost, of insulin when eating or when blood sugar levels rise above a set level. Diabetic complications are greatly reduced when blood sugar levels are regulated.

The next step is the artificial pancreas, which will combine the pump with a constant glucose monitor that will work jointly to adjust insulin levels to continuously control glucose (sugar) levels. The FDA granted initial approval for such a system late last year.

Not a bad track record, to go from being able to keep type 1 diabetics alive with injections of animal insulin to being able to manufacture cloned human insulin and regulate its use artificially in under a century when dealing with a disease that has been recognized for over 30 centuries.

 

The Origin of the Illinois State Highway Patrol – Excerpt

The following is a short excerpt from my History Master’s Thesis at the University of Illinois – Springfield. An original copy of this work resides in the UIS Archives, the U.S. National Archives, and in the archives of the Illinois State Police Heritage Foundation and Museum. If you would like to read more, let me know, and I’ll post more next Sunday…

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The Origin of the Illinois State Highway Patrol

Copyright 1998 © Kevin E. Hughes

Introduction

It had been raining hard for three days, and the dark, slowly churning clouds held no promise of relief.  Governor-hopeful Lennington Small sat in the back seat of his son Leslie’s 1919 Paige Touring Car, Illinois license number “8251”.  Len was a handsome, stocky man of 44, with balding head and bushy moustache.  He watched the rain collect into rivulets on the side window.  He could easily have been thinking to himself, “This trip should have taken me two-and-a-half hours at best!  Now I’ve been trying to get to Kankakee for almost a full day.”

How relevant seemed the haunting words of the journalist J.C. Burton, “… is the supposition correct that there are no highways winding through the fertile fields on which a speed of 20 miles an hour can be maintained without pounding a motor car to pieces and inviting Trouble to jump from Pandora’s box to the bonnet of the machine?”[1]

Candidate Small was headed home to Kankakee following a campaign tour by rail and airplane of Illinois. The Small campaign had shifted into high gear on October 18, 1920, the day in which presidential-hopeful Ohio Senator Warren G. Harding’s campaign train made its first Illinois stop at Kankakee’s Illinois Central Railroad depot.  An enthusiastic crowd greeted Harding, and he assured the assembled crowd “…that he and Len Small would carry Illinois.”[2]  Harding was voicing the campaign slogan, “Return to Normalcy.”  Small was promising to “pull Illinois out of the mud” by building hard (paved) roads throughout the state.

In 1920, Illinois was readily traversed in all directions by railway.  It was a reliable method of travel, although not particularly fast.  For example, in the early 1900s, three eastbound and three westbound trains stopped daily in Oregon, Illinois (100 miles west of Chicago) on the route from Chicago to Minneapolis, plus there was twice-daily service northwest to Galena. “It took from one-and-a-half to three hours to get 22 miles from Oregon to neighboring Rockford by rail, four-and-a-half hours to return on the 5:15 p.m. train… to get 16 miles from Oregon to neighboring Dixon took an hour-and-a-half by rail…”[3]  The Rockford to Oregon trip via horse and buggy, by comparison, took only four hours.  Illinois in 1915 had 12,157 miles of steam railway, and 3,760 miles of electric railway.  Yet by 1918, Illinois only had 427.77 miles of paved roadway.[4]  The main advantage of rail was that trains could run year-round, whereas the dirt roads of the day were impassable much of the year. In spring or fall they were merely mud-bogs and in winter were mostly deep frozen ruts sunk into the rural landscape.

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State road near Mount Carroll, Illinois

[1] J.C. Burton, ”The Rock River Valley and Its Cities” (1913), in Paul M. Angle, ed. Prairie State: Impressions of Illinois, 1673-1967, by Travelers and Other Observers (Chicago, 1968), p. 455.
[2] Mary Jean Houde, Of the People: A Popular History of Kankakee County (Chicago, 1968), p. 300.
[3] James J. Flink, The Automobile Age (Cambridge, 1992), p. 137.
[4] Louis L. Emmerson, ed. Illinois Blue Book: 1917/18 (Springfield, 1917), p. 383.

©Kevin E. Hughes  and http://www.msgt3227blog.wordpress.com, 1998 – 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kevin E. Hughes and msgt3227blog.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Note: I have decided that publishing the entirety of my thesis would exhaust/fill my storage capacity on my blog, so I have opened a dedicated site just for this history. It is located at:  https://illinoishighwaypatrol.wordpress.com/.

The Stars and Me

I love this poem! It is cheerful, optimistic, and just darned fun!!!

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Victoria has us repeating ourselves over at d’Verse Poets Pub
I’ll Say It Again (and Again and Again)


The Stars and Me

I thought I saw the stars wink at me
As if they knew my secret
I thought I heard the stars whisper
As if they might be gossiping
I thought I felt the stars hopping
As if they could share my joy
I thought I whiffed the scent of stardust
As if the stars were blooming
And so I turned my face up
To the sky and blew the stars
A kiss

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